The Myth of the VC Series A for Angel Funded Companies (or any others)

The Myth of the VC Series A for Angel Funded Companies (or any others)

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Very few Angel investments receive follow on funding from venture capital firms.

According to the University of New Hampshire, Centre for Venture Research there were around 75,000 Angel investments in the USA last year. Yet the PWC Moneytree report recorded just 5,004 VC deals (of which 33% were in the San Francisco area). So even if every VC deal had previously had Angel funding, that would still be a tiny fraction of Angel backed companies going on to secure any form of VC funding.

CB insights reported that 68% of USA and European successful technology company exits had received no VC funding before the exit.

These numbers are supported by the research in Scott A. Shane book “Fools Gold? The Truth Behind Angel Investing In America”, (Oxford University Press, 2009). “Fools Gold? is possibly the first book to bring together hard data on angel investing within the USA from multiple governmental and academic sources, including the Internal Revenue Service, the US Census Bureau, the Federal Reserve, the Kauffman foundation and many others. The book so encourages Angels to invest as part of an Angel group, and encourages policy makers to invest in supporting the creating of angel groups. This to facilitate a portfolio style of investing and the pooling of investment funds to provide larger amounts of funding over a longer period than would be possible as a solo investor.

Fundamentally Angel investors need to plan for the Whole Life funding of their companies. They cannot just assume that future funding will be provided by some as yet unidentified VC. They must therefore crowd in as many investors as they can into the first and other early rounds, even where this means each individual investor investing less into each deal than they could, or would like to. Only in that way will there be sufficient future reserves of capital to fund the likely 4 or 5 rounds typically necessary to get to a successful exit.